A Pasadena Landmark Reopens for Indoor Tours – NBC Southern California

The start of November?
It’s the end of Halloween, yes, and the start of the Thanksgiving season, and, let’s be real: Christmas is already here, at least in any store you stop by.
But various celebratory factions are also in pre-festive mode around Pasadena, for the Crown City’s biggest event, a New Year’s Day spectacular known as the Rose Parade presented by Honda, is just two months out.
And one of Pasadena’s best-known sights, a landmark that has long welcomed visitors, both during the Tournament of Roses season and throughout the rest of the calendar, too, will be at the ready when the Rose Parade revs up.
For the Gamble House, that woodsy, stained-glassy, brick-laden wonder that sits up Orange Grove Boulevard, on Westmoreland Place, is reopening for interior tours on Tuesday, Nov. 2.
The house, which was designed by lauded architects Charles and Henry Greene in 1908, was constructed for members of the Gamble family, of Procter & Gamble fame.
Today, the elegant abode is owned by the City of Pasadena, while the Gamble House Conservancy provides stewardship and guidance.
Interior tours have long been at the heart of the handsome house, which is famous for its woodsy joinery, airy upstairs porches, nature-inspired stained glass, and indoor-outdoor character.
Inside peek-arounds were put on hold early in the pandemic, while outdoor tours gave devotees of the destination a look at the gardens, patios, and all of that charming brickwork.
Now inside visits are back, but advance tickets are a must.

What can a first-time visitor expect on the classic, docent-helmed one-hour tour?
“On this tour, your docent will lead an exploration of the house and its history through rooms lined with rare woods, featuring handcrafted details, fixtures, and furnishings designed by the architects and unique to the house.”
“The Gamble House exemplifies the work of Greene & Greene, illuminating the themes in their work that contributed significantly to Southern California’s early 20th century artistic heritage and built environment.”
Visitors should be vaccinated, and guests are asked to wear masks while inside.
For other tours available, take a look at this page. Oh yes: And The Gamble House Bookstore is also on the grounds of the house, with items available for curbside pick-up.
Do we even dare say that tours of the house provide a chance to travel back in time? Yes, we think we will say it. After all, The Gamble House famously served as Doc Brown’s home, and his lab stood where the bookstore stands today, in 1985’s beloved “Back to the Future.”

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